Articles, Conference and Workshop Papers Collection

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    Understanding dynamics of farmer-pastoralist conflicts in Tanzania: insights from Kilosa district case study
    (International Journal of Agricultural Extension, 2023) Ntumva, Mabebe E.
    Farmer-pastoralist conflicts over land resources in Tanzania are increasingly raising concerns in terms of security, livelihoods, and socioeconomic development. Against this backdrop, the article focuses on the Kilosa district case study to unveil the socio- political dynamics surrounding these conflicts to enhance insightful understanding. The article employs the environmental security and political ecology theories to explore the theoretical debates about the conflicts in question. The article draws on social constructionism philosophy that allows stakeholders’ perspectives to be the epicentre of interpretation and analysis. It further draws on qualitative research design where a range of qualitative data collection techniques were employed, including in-depth interviews, focused group discussions, and documentary reviews. Data collected were analyzed through thematic and narrative analysis techniques, where resulting themes were interpreted and discursively integrated with existing literature. The findings show how the environmental security and political ecology theories reinforce or contrast the nature of farmer-pastoralist conflict dynamics in the district. It further suggests broader engagement of stakeholders in determining contested needs, areas of contradiction and a relevant framework for resource governance, access, and management of related conflicts.
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    Land conflict dynamics in Africa: a critical review on farmer-pastoralist conflict perspectives
    (Academic Journals, 2022) Ntumva, Mabebe Erasmus
    This paper examines the theoretical bases underlying the causes of land conflicts. It involves a critical analysis of various contentions surrounding land nexus violent conflicts with particular attention to farmer-pastoralist conflicts. The drive for this examination is more on a comparison of causes between such conflicts in varying contexts of African. The major aim is to broaden the understanding about the nature of these conflicts with the prospect of setting grounds for scholars and policy makers for reviewing and crafting relevant intervening measures. The paper draws on debates and literature on farmer-pastoralist conflict to develop insights into their dynamics. This aims at making stakeholders informed of the existing gaps in research and underlying causes that could be capitalized on in devising relevant mitigating measures. The review shows that the uncontrolled interaction of the supply; demand and structural induced aspects contribute to the state of inequality, competition, and conflicts among land users. This situation is found to be aggravated by the social and political conditions surrounding the causes and governance of natural resources, with typical scenario of the changing policies of land tenure that have exacerbated increasing land grabbing and tenure insecurities. The paper recommends the need for revisiting the formal and informal structures that governs resource distribution in a bid to alleviate existing land- access inequalities and conflicts.
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    Towards a flame work for accessing agricultural makert information
    (2015) Magesa, Mawazo M.; Michael, Kisangiri; Ko, Jesuk
    Making markets work for the poor in rural communities involves different stakeholders. Management, development partners, private sector and NGOs are accustomed to ensure enabling infrastructure is provided. Access to markets requires good transport and low transaction cost accompanied with recent market information. To provide market information to rural community, stakeholders may initiate the program by providing funds and finding the means of ensuring the sustainability of the program. Delivering market information requires established ICT infrastructure and capable staffing. Thus, a framework to access agricultural market information requires management to provide infrastructure and funding, and also to ensure rural areas are equipped with the technology
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    The role of farmer research networks’ (frn) principles in influencing farmers’ adoption of improved groundnut cultivars in Singida rural district of semi-Arid central Tanzania
    (Academic Journals, 2023) Chilewa, Humphrey Shadrack; Martin, Respikius; Ntumva, Mabebe
    Farmer Research Networks (FRN) is a participatory approach aimed at supporting the agroecological intensification of smallholder farming. FRN was envisaged in Latin America and Africa, however, little has been documented on how the application of FRN principles influences adoption of agricultural technologies. Guided by networking, innovation systems and Roger’s theories of diffusion of innovations, this research assessed how the application of three principles, that is, 1) farmer participation, 2) usefulness of on-farm research, and 3) collaboration amongst players in networks influenced the adoption of improved groundnuts. Cross sectional mixed research methods were used. Findings show that farmers participated in forming FRN groups, the production of Quality Declared Seeds and the provision of farmer-to-farmer extension services. On-farm research was instrumental for observational and experimental research whereby farmers were able to see, learn, and adopt the innovation. Players collaborate through joint research, learning, and sharing of knowledge and resources; farmers’ field days; and project meetings. It is concluded that farmers participated in conducting on-farm research and collaborated with different players in the network, indicating that FRN principles were applied to influence the adoption of improved groundnuts. The study recommends farmer participation in preliminary meetings and strengthening the linkage between farmers and more actors.
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    Farmer-pastoralist conflicts management approaches in Sub-Saharan Africa: Insights into their strengths and pitfalls
    (Academic Journals, 2022) Ntumva, Mabebe Erasmus
    This article provides a critical review of the different theoretical perspectives on the existing conflict management mechanisms. Focus has been paid on the dynamics surrounding these mechanisms in relation to the changing contexts and times. The primary aim is: First, to identify what is already known about the available conflict-management mechanisms for handling farmer-pastoralist conflicts including the current direction of the research; second, to develop a relevant synthesis framework that can: (a) reflect the strengths and pitfalls of the available conflict management mechanisms in relation to the changing nature of the conflicts, (b) inform the development and analysis of case study research on the relevance of the existing mechanisms for conflict management in relation to the nature of the conflicts; third, to clarify key areas of discussion and further inquiry on conflict management mechanisms to which this review might usefully contribute. The article draws from critical literature, theoretical and case study analysis to gain an insight into dynamics surrounding farmer-pastoral conflicts management approaches. The central question guiding this discussion is ‘what dynamics surround farmer-pastoral conflict management mechanisms across varying contexts and times in sub- Saharan Africa? The article concludes that there is hardly any single mechanism capable of addressing the different causes of the farmer–pastoralist conflicts and more so in varying contexts and times. This situation suggests complementarity as perhaps a relevant approach for meaningful farmer-pastoralist conflicts management.
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    Factors influencing the level of water access for livestock in semi-arid areas of Monduli district, Tanzania
    (Tanzania Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 2023) Mfinanga, F.A; Msuya, C.P; Madaha, R
    Access to water by livestock is critical for their growth, reproduction and quality of products. However, despite its relevance, water access for livestock has received comparatively little attention in developing countries Tanzania included. Therefore, the paper examines factors influencing water access for livestock in the semi-arid areas of Monduli district, Tanzania. A cross-sectional research design was adopted whereby primary data was collected using a pre-structured questionnaire discussions from 367 randomly selected pastoralist households. In addition, focus group discussions were used to allow triangulation. Quantitative data were analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) whereby both descriptive (frequencies and percentages) and inferential statistics were determined. An ordinal logistic regression model was used to determine the factors associated with livestock access to water. Qualitative data was analysed using content analysis. The findings show that the majority (76.3%) of households experienced low levels of water access for their livestock. Additionally, findings show that off-farm income, access to credit, access to subsidies and the use of donkey carts and or tied jerry cans onto donkeys were significantly associated with water access by livestock. The study concludes that most pastoralists in the Monduli district have a low level of water access for livestock. Therefore, it is recommended that all stakeholders in water and livestock sectors should come up with strategies that ensure pastoral communities have access to sufficient amounts of water for their livestock.
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    Assessment of economic and socio-economic factors affecting the demand for goats and goat meat in Malawi
    (2012-09) Masangano, J.C.
    The general objective of this study is to assess the economic and socio-demographic factors affecting the demand for goats and goat meat in Malawi. Specifically, the project will: determine the levels of demand of goats and goat meat in urban and rural areas of Malawi; determine the major economic and socio- demographic factors affecting the demand of goat and goat meat in the various agro-geographic or regional locations of Malawi; and evaluate consumers response with respect to price changes of goats and goat meat relative to beef and potential effect of changing some of the factors affecting the demand.
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    Community participation in rural water supply projects: Influencing factors and challenges in Nyasa district
    (Research Gate, 2022-10) Bakari, Stephen J.; Mbunda, Fokas Abel
    This study investigated community participation in rural water supply projects in Nyasa district as a case study, where several community water supply projects have been initiated by the government. Projects have always collapsed once the country government pulls out, cases attached to low community participation were always experienced as now the study intends to explore the influencing factors and challenges for participation. The study was guided by the given research objectives named to explore the influencing factors and challenges for community participation in rural water supply projects in the study area. Non- experimental design was used to collect data in a study area. The respondents were stratified in two categories such as the project beneficiaries and key informants. Purposive sampling technique was used to select key informants while simple random sampling was used to select household heads benefited with the project. A sample size of 98 was selected from a target population of 4,967 household heads. The interview questionnaires, observation through checklist and documentary review were used to collect both primary and secondary data. The collected data was analyzed using both qualitative and quantitative techniques by IBM SPSS v.20 to ensure triangulation. The study concluded that majority of the community members participated in water supply projects in implementation phase by material incentives than in other levels, the community awareness was a significant factor that influenced negatively in people`s participation and financial resources is a significant barrier for the community to participate in water development project. Then the study recommended that community members have to be actively involved in all stages of the project life cycle including decision making in planning, frequent seminars and workshops for building awareness and empowering women on the importance of participating among and budget should be allocated and timely disbursed to facilitate the community participation in water supply projects.
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    The influence of geographical concentration of firms on performance of small agro food processing enterprises in Tanzania
    (Elsevier B.V., 2021-10-22) Seluhinga, Nicetus S.; Philip, Damas
    Geographical concentration/clustering of firms are important in growth of small agro processing firms, having prominent impact in the subsector. Using descriptive statistics, gross sales per worker measured in normal and seasonal monthly output production. This paper assesses the performance of small agro food processing firms by comparing the performance of 31 geographically concentrated firms and 31 dispersed firms using three empirical considerations namely: output per worker, enterprise employment intake (EEI) and average sales per worker were used to analyze the difference in performance of agro food processing enterprises located in clustered/ geographically concentrated relative to others located elsewhere enterprise employment intake (EEI). Survival costs were used to determine sunk costs which are the difference between survival costs and total costs of successful design. Remarkably the results showed that there are differences in mean output per works in both normal and seasonal production. In seasonal production the difference in mean output per worker between firms in clustered and non-clustered firms were significant (p value = 0.0510) compared to normal production with (p value = 0.000). This shows that there is slight significant difference between clustered and non-clustered firms respectively. The results further show that enterprise employment intake vary in the sub sector vary between districts. The survival costs between clustered and non-clustered. Firms show that the cost of staying in the market by sampled agro processing firms is very high because the total value of products in the market is very low. The paper concludes that cluster initiatives with specialization improve the performance of small firms.
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    The impact of rice commercialisation on livelihoods in Kilombero valley, Tanzania: anybody left behind?
    (Sokoine University of Agriculture, 2021) Mosha, D.B.; Boniface, G.
    Rice commercialisation is important in Kilombero valley because it is associated with agricultural intensification and escalation leading to increased productivity and subsequent income and livelihood improvement. However, the level of household engagement in rice commercialisation is highly dynamic depending on various factors including resource endowment, social, economic, cultural, institutional, and gender issues. Moreover, the mechanism by which different gender social groups are impacted by rice commercialisation is scantly documented. This paper, therefore, examined the impact of rice commercialisation on the livelihood of different farmers with respect to gender social groups. The empirical exercise uses a panel data set of the Agricultural Policy Research in Africa (APRA) collected in 2017 and 2019. The survey involved 537 and 801 rice farming households in the first and second wave of data collection. A mixed-methods approach involving household interviews, focused group discussion and key informant interviews (KIIs) of data collection were used. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis were employed as tangible ways of presenting the findings. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected using a structured questionnaire, and Focus Group Discussions (FGDs). Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were employed in the presentation of the finding. Female, youth, and small-scale farmers are the gender social groups negatively impacted with rice commercialisation compared to others, attributed by inadequate access to land and to improve agricultural inputs; reflecting that the gender gap remains a challenge in Kilombero valley. There is a need to develop friendly policy strategies that will provide equitable access to production resources and that the Ministry of Agriculture in collaboration with local government authority need to develop a new strategy that will guarantee cumulative and sound rice commercialisation improvement.
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    Local perception of household vulnerability to food insecurity in Bahi district, Tanzania
    (Science and Education Publishing, 2020) Shausi, Gosbert Lukenku
    A study was carried out in Bahi District of Central Tanzania to explore local perceptions of food security and vulnerability to food insecurity. In this area millet is the staple food. In this regard, a household without enough millet to feed its members for the whole year was perceived food insecure even if it had access to other foodstuffs. Also, a household that depleted its millet stocks in less than 12 months was perceived food insecure while vulnerability was perceived as a state of being food insecure and/or being at risk of becoming food insecure. Based on local perceptions, 76% of the sampled households were found vulnerable to food insecurity whereas 24% were not. Besides, majority of the households were food insecure (63%) while only 37% households were food secure. Various factors were associated with household vulnerability to food insecurity. These factors include household being headed by a very old person (70 years and above); lack of alternative sources of income; misuse or improper handling of the produced food; a household having dependents (children under 13 years and old persons of over 70 years old). Therefore interventions to improve food security and reduce vulnerability to food insecurity should address these factors and seek to improve millet production.
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    The implications of Tanzania privatization policy on small scale farmers: the case of Misenyi and Kilosa districts
    (Sacha & Diamond, England, United Kingdom, 2015) Shausi, G.; Agunga, R; Erbaugh, M.
    Since 2000 the Government of Tanzania has adopted pluralistic and demand driven (privatization) extension as an alternative way of increasing productivity in the smallholder farming sector. It was felt that privatization would give farmers more choices, increase efficiency in public sector extension, and reduce the burden of government funding extension. After more than a decade of the new extension program our study sought to determine its effectiveness. Our survey of 300 smallholder farmers in two districts of Tanzania found limited adoption of innovations by smallholder farmers, including limited interaction with extension agents, and virtually no provision of extension by private agencies in the districts. Our conclusion is that while the new extension approach is a good idea, its implementation leaves much to be desired. We recommend increased interaction between farmers and extension workers, such as through the use of mass and social media like community radio and cell phones.
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    Maize farmers’ knowledge and perception of improved postharvest storage technologies in Kilolo District, Tanzania
    (Journal of Stored Products and Postharvest Research, 2020) Ahmad, Athman Kyaruzi; Shausi, Gosbert Lukenku
    This study assessed small-scale maize farmers’ knowledge and perception on the use of improved postharvest storage technologies in Kilolo District, Tanzania. The participants of the study include 260 farmers who were randomly selected from four villages. Data were collected by using interview schedule, questionnaire, Focus Group Discussions (FGD) and personal observation. Descriptive statistics such as means, frequencies, and percentages were computed. The study found that majority of respondents had low knowledge on the use of improved postharvest storage technologies. However, majority of the respondents had positive attitudes towards the use of improved postharvest technologies. It is recommended that Kilolo District Council and other development partners should promote the use of improved post-harvest technologies to reduce maize post-harvest losses; develop training programs on capacity building of extension officers and farmers on postharvest handling of maize and ensure that maize postharvest storage technologies are made available to farmers at a subsidized price.
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    Attitude of crop farmers towards public agricultural extension services: implication for extension programming in Tanzania
    (College of Social Sciences and Humanities, Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA), Morogoro-Tanzania, 2021) Shausi, Gosbert Lukenku; Ahmad, Athman Kyaruzi
    Overtime, effectiveness of extension service has been the focus of many studies. However, most of these studies have paid more attention on the service itself neglecting the service users’ attitude about that service. It is envisaged that a positive attitude is a key requirement for service utilization. Therefore, this study assessed crop farmers’ attitudes towards agricultural extension services (AESs) in Mpwapwa and Mvomero districts. The study was conducted from December 2017 to February 2018 and used questionnaire and focus group discussions to collect data from 292 participants who were randomly selected. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics (frequency counts, mean, and percentages), and content analysis. The study found that although AESs were provided in the study area 40.1% of farmers were never visited by extension agents in a month before the study. It was further revealed that 73.5% of the respondents had a favourable attitude towards AESs that are provided in the study area. It was concluded that overall farmers have positive attitude towards public extension service although the service seems not to perform better in areas of marketing, value addition and access to loans and credits. The study recommends that efforts should be made to make sure that all farmers are visited by extension agents. Additionally, extension service should increase emphasis on linking farmers with markets, loans and credits, and capacity building on crop value addition.
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    Challenges facing small-scale cashew nut processors in Ruangwa district, Tanzania: an implication for policy change
    (European Journal of Agriculture and Food Sciences, 2022) Mgonja, Nemganga Salimu; Shausi, Gosbert Lukenku
    This study was carried out to assess the challenges faced by small-scale cashew nut processors in Ruangwa District, Tanzania. The study employed a correlational research design using a survey on a sample of 180 small-scale cashew nut processors. Data were collected through questionnaire administration, focus group discussions, key informant interviews and documentary reviews. Quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics and content analysis respectively. The study revealed the following challenges that face small-scale cashew nut processors: use of inefficient local processing tools, less availability of appropriate equipment and machine for processing, lack of money to acquire new technology, and lack of investment and working capital. Other challenges were the availability of raw materials, lack of market information on kernel, lack of reliable training facilities, and lack of government initiative support on cashew nut processing. The study recommends improvement and facilitation of modern processing equipment, training processors on improved processing techniques and improvement of domestic and international cashew nut markets.
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    Factors influencing use of improved postharvest storage technologies among small scale maize farmers: a case of Kilolo district, Tanzania
    (An International Journal of Basic and Applied Research, 2020) Twilumba, J. K.; Ahmad, A. K.; Shausi, G. L.
    The study assessed factors influencing the use of improved postharvest storage technologies among small-scale maize farmers in Kilolo District, Tanzania. Data were collected from 260 maize farmers by using the questionnaire, Focus Group Discussions (FGD) and through personal observations. Descriptive statistics such as means, frequencies, percentage and a binary logistic regression model were computed. Formal education, access to credit, access to extension services, membership in farmer groups and distance from home to the market place were found to be the farmers’ determinants of the use of improved postharvest storage technologies. The study recommends that extension agents should increase their contact with farmers, the government should look for possibilities to subsidize improved postharvest storage technologies with a high initial cost in order to enhance their use. Additionally, the Kilolo District Council and other development partners should encourage farmers to form groups for community food storage such as cereal banks and warehouse receipts system.
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    Intra-household decision making on production and income generation options among women in Mara Region, Tanzania
    (Sokoine University of Agriculture., 2022) Ndossi, M.J; Ahmad, K.A; Makindara, J.R
    Women’s ability to make decisions on production matters and income generation in the household is crucial to reduce gender based violence, improve women’s production ability, improve livelihood of household members and reduce poverty among women and a country in general. The study examined the contribution of Cassava Adding Value for Africa II project towards empowering women cassava producers to make decisions on production matters and income generated from cassava crops. The study was conducted in Rorya, Bunda and Serengeti Districts in Mara Region where the project was implemented. The study employed census method whereby data were collected from all the three project Districts and wards. A total of 246 women participants and those who did not participate were randomly selected. The proportion of 50% was applied to select the participants from the sampling frames of women who participated in the project and those who did not. A questionnaire was used to collect quantitative data and Focus Group Discussion and Semi-structured interviews were used to collect qualitative data. Quantitative data collected using questionnaires were used to compute levels of women empowerment. Furthermore, chi-square tests were run to reveal if there were any associations between socio-economic characteristics and level of women empowerment. The results showed that women who participated in the cassava value chain intervention project were categorized into high level of women empowerment compared to women who did not, and who were categorized into low level of women empowerment. These findings suggest that agricultural training provided by CAVA II project exposed women to new, updated and improved methods of cultivating cassava. The findings show further that women with five or more acres of cultivating cassava were categorized into high level because they possessed more acres, plus the training received from the project which resulted into high cassava yields. The findings also show that age had an association with the level of women empowerments whereby women between the ages of 35 and 55 were classified as having a high level of women empowerment, which was linked to their age. This shows that in patriarchal society, women of this age, whether married or not, were considered mature enough to make judgments. In comparison, women and girls between the ages of 15 and 34 were not allowed to make decisions in the home that affected productivity and income. The other significant association revealed by the study was between farm and wage labor activities and level of women empowerment. The findings show that women who were farmers and employed were categorized into high level of women empowerment as compared to women who were only livestock keepers. It is therefore can be concluded that interventions which target women in agricultural production can increase their empowerment status hence influence their decision making in production and use of resources required from production activities. It is therefore recommend that Government and Development partners programmes should design and implement project which will enhance women empowerment and which in turn will increase their participation in decision making at the household levels. This will lead to improved livelihood and reduction of poverty in farming communities in Tanzania
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    Intra-household decision making on production and income generation options among women in Mara Region, Tanzania
    (Sokoine University of Agriculture., 2022) Ndossi, M.J; Ahmad, K.A; Makindara, J.R
    Women’s ability to make decisions on production matters and income generation in the household is crucial to reduce gender based violence, improve women’s production ability, improve livelihood of household members and reduce poverty among women and a country in general. The study examined the contribution of Cassava Adding Value for Africa II project towards empowering women cassava producers to make decisions on production matters and income generated from cassava crops. The study was conducted in Rorya, Bunda and Serengeti Districts in Mara Region where the project was implemented. The study employed census method whereby data were collected from all the three project Districts and wards. A total of 246 women participants and those who did not participate were randomly selected. The proportion of 50% was applied to select the participants from the sampling frames of women who participated in the project and those who did not. A questionnaire was used to collect quantitative data and Focus Group Discussion and Semi-structured interviews were used to collect qualitative data. Quantitative data collected using questionnaires were used to compute levels of women empowerment. Furthermore, chi-square tests were run to reveal if there were any associations between socio-economic characteristics and level of women empowerment. The results showed that women who participated in the cassava value chain intervention project were categorized into high level of women empowerment compared to women who did not, and who were categorized into low level of women empowerment. These findings suggest that agricultural training provided by CAVA II project exposed women to new, updated and improved methods of cultivating cassava. The findings show further that women with five or more acres of cultivating cassava were categorized into high level because they possessed more acres, plus the training received from the project which resulted into high cassava yields. The findings also show that age had an association with the level of women empowerments whereby women between the ages of 35 and 55 were classified as having a high level of women empowerment, which was linked to their age. This shows that in patriarchal society, women of this age, whether married or not, were considered mature enough to make judgments. In comparison, women and girls between the ages of 15 and 34 were not allowed to make decisions in the home that affected productivity and income. The other significant association revealed by the study was between farm and wage labor activities and level of women empowerment. The findings show that women who were farmers and employed were categorized into high level of women empowerment as compared to women who were only livestock keepers. It is therefore can be concluded that interventions which target women in agricultural production can increase their empowerment status hence influence their decision making in production and use of resources required from production activities. It is therefore recommend that Government and Development partners programmes should design and implement project which will enhance women empowerment and which in turn will increase their participation in decision making at the household levels. This will lead to improved livelihood and reduction of poverty in farming communities in Tanzania.
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    The contribution of improved chicken strains in promoting women empowerment in Bariadi and Muheza districts, Tanzania
    (AJOL, 2021) Maunde, R. M.; Lyimo-Macha, J.G.; Jeckoniah, J.N.
    Increasing number of development projects espouse objectives of women’s empowerment. However, mechanism by which agricultural development projects can enhance women empowerment is scantly documented. Therefore, this paper aimed at assessing the role of improved chicken strains in promoting women empowerment. The study which this paper is based on, involved 240 women (120 beneficiaries of African Chicken Genetic Gain [ACGG] and 120 non-beneficiaries) from Bariadi and Muheza districts. Cross-sectional research and mixed methods of data collection were used. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected using a structured questionnaire, Key Informant Interviews (KIIs) and Focus Group Discussions (FGDs). Extent of women empowerment among beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries of ACGG project was measured using a Composite Empowerment Index (CEI). Content analysis was used to analyse qualitative data. Quantitative data were analysed by using descriptive statistics. Results showed that ACGG project provided women’s access to initial stock of improved chicks and vaccines as well as extension and training services. Women who benefited from ACGG were more empowered (CEI = 0.714) as compared to non-beneficiaries (CEI = 0.529). Based on the findings, women empowerment has been realised through the intervention of the improved chicken which were sponsored by the ACGG project. However, the ACGG project focused more on creating an enabling environment for women’s access to productive resources than on addressing social settings that influence women’s status. It was thus recommended to the ACGG project, Local Government Authorities and development partners to scale up improved chicken interventions to other areas and promote initiatives to challenge social institutions that have an impact on women’s life.
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    Understanding roles of different stakeholders influencing the use of mobile phones to access agricultural information: A case of Kilolo and Kilosa districts, Tanzania
    (IJASRT in EESs, 2020-06) Nyamba, Siwel Yohakim.; Malongo, Malongo R.
    T he study investigated roles of different stakeholders influencing the use of mobile phones in accessing agricultural information in Tanzania. While information is becoming an important ingredient in agriculture, farmers in Tanzania suffer the problem of lacking access to agricultural information. Promisingly, mobile phone technology has become the most valued infrastructure which gives people access to information and services they need. Actually, the subscription of mobile phones in Tanzania is ubiquitous and is ever-growing. However, many farmers are not fully utilizing the potential that the technology prevails. There is an apparent disparity between mobile phone subscriptions which is increasingly being adopted on one hand and their uptake into farming practices. The question is, why farmers not fully utilizing the potential the technology prevails in agriculture and how could they be helped? The research adopted a multi-stage sampling technique whereby, initially two districts were purposively selected followed by a simple random sampling technique to obtain 240 respondents. Data collection methods used was: interviews, key informants interviews, and focus group discussions. Quantitative data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social (SPSS), whereby some descriptive statistics including frequencies, means, percentages and standard deviations were determined. Chi- square tests and regression analysis were also performed to test for the relationship between variables and determine variables that are the best predictors, respectively.