Sokoine University of Agriculture

Epidemiological study of infectious bursal disease virus in selected districts of the Copperbelt province in Zambia

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Chawinga, Kenneth
dc.date.accessioned 2017-05-29T16:05:29Z
dc.date.available 2017-05-29T16:05:29Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri http://www.suaire.suanet.ac.tz:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/1541
dc.description A DISERTATION SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FUFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY OF THE SOKOINE UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURE. MOROGORO, TANZANIA. 2016 en_US
dc.description.abstract Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is a highly contagious disease of young chickens between 3 and 6 weeks of age. It is caused by infectious bursal disease virus(IBDV) which occursworldwide affecting livelihoods of resource - compromised poor communities. In Zambia, there is scantily documented information on the epidemiology of IBD. In-depth knowledge on the epidemiology of IBD is needed for effective control measures. This study aimed at molecular detection of circulating IBDV strains, andknowledge assessment of farmers about the disease in Ndola, Kitwe, Kalulushi, Luanshya and Mufulira districts of the Copperbelt province. A cross-sectional purposive study was carried out in the Copperbelt province from February to March, 2015 to determine the occurrence of IBD. The identification of IBDV was done by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) targeting the hypervariable domain (VP2-HVR). A semi-structured questionnaire was administered to 77 respondents who presented poultry related cases to clinics in the selected districts and the information collected was analyzed by statistical package for social scientists (SPSS). A total of 30 bursa of Fabricius samples from young chickens that presented with clinical signs suggestive of IBD were examined. The RTPCR results revealed two positive samples for IBDV VP2-HVR domain. Questionnaire study revealed that 70.0% (n=10) of the respondents did not know what disinfectant to use; 75.0% (n=57) felt assigning more than one individual to a flock of chickens did not compromise biosecurity whereas 20.3% (n=15) knew the important clinical signs of IBD, compared to 60.1% (n=46) and 70.7% (n=54) that knew clinical signs related to chronicrespiratory disease and ND respectively. Ninety six percent (n= 73) adhered to vaccine cold chain practices. These findings indicate that IBD viruses circulated in the Copperbelt province and chicken farmers had low awareness of IBD and respective disease control measures. Further studies to characterize the circulating IBD viruses to unravel more information for the rational IBD control strategy in Zambia are required. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Sokoine University of Agriculture en_US
dc.subject Epidemiological study en_US
dc.subject Infectious bursal disease virus en_US
dc.subject Copperbelt province en_US
dc.subject Zambia en_US
dc.subject Epidemiology en_US
dc.title Epidemiological study of infectious bursal disease virus in selected districts of the Copperbelt province in Zambia en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search SUA IR


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Statistics