Sokoine University of Agriculture

Assessment of the wholesale-consumer segment of the value chain for fresh fruits and vegetables in Dar es salaam: a case of Ilala municipal

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dc.contributor.author Cosmas, Benedicto Chakaza
dc.date.accessioned 2015-02-05T11:03:38Z
dc.date.available 2015-02-05T11:03:38Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Cosmas,B.C(2008)Assessment Of The Wholesale-Consumer Segment Of The Value Chain For Fresh Fruits And Vegetables In Dar Es Salaam: A Case Of Ilala Municipal .Morogoro;Sokoine University of Agriculture en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.suaire.sua.ac.tz/handle/123456789/420
dc.description.abstract This study was conducted to assess the wholesale-consumer segment of the value chain for five key fresh fruits and vegetables (FFV) including tomato, dry onion, cabbage, orange and amaranth. Structured questionnaires were used to collect data which were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Gross margin analysis was used to develop a preliminary estimate of gross wholesale and retail margins. Logistic regression was used to test the significance of factors that influence consumers’ purchasing preferences. The most important source of FFV supply to Dar-es-Salaam market were Arumeru district in Arusha region, Lushoto in Tanga, Makambako, Kidamari and Ilula in Iringa, Matombo and Mgeta in Morogoro, Moshi rural in Kilimanjaro and Kibaha and Msanga in Coast region. The gross margins were found to vary vertically across the chain and horizontally across markets. FFV prices were found to vary significantly between supermarkets and open-air markets. Majority of consumers from both markets valued reliability, freshness, market premises, product outlook/packaging, customer services and food safety as important factors that determine their preferences about where to purchase. However, while price and tradition were valued as less important by Shoprite consumers, they were valued as important by those in other markets. Supermarkets were found to be important markets for higher income earners where as open-air markets appeared to serve all income categories but mostly low income consumers. Consumers with monthly income above Tsh. 500 000, those who valued prices and reliability as less important, market premises, product outlook and food safety as most important were found most likely to purchase FFV from supermarkets whereas those who valued freshness and accessibility as most important and market premises as less important were less likely to purchase FFV from this market. It is recommended the government collaboratively work with private sector traders to establish accepted and workable quality grades and standards that recognize constraints that the traditional sector faces. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship United State Agency for International Development (USAID) Higher Education Partnership for Agricultural Development (HEPAD) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Sokoine University of Agriculture en_US
dc.subject Value Chain en_US
dc.subject Fresh Fruits en_US
dc.subject Vegetables en_US
dc.subject Dar Es Salaam en_US
dc.subject Ilala Municipal en_US
dc.title Assessment of the wholesale-consumer segment of the value chain for fresh fruits and vegetables in Dar es salaam: a case of Ilala municipal en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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