Sokoine University of Agriculture

How do local subjectivities interfere with the domestic enforcement of International laws on corruption in selected regions of Tanzania?

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dc.contributor.author Madaha, Rasel
dc.date.accessioned 2021-07-23T12:23:14Z
dc.date.available 2021-07-23T12:23:14Z
dc.date.issued 2021
dc.identifier.citation Madaha, Rasel (2021). How do local subjectivities interfere with the domestic enforcement of International laws on corruption in selected regions of Tanzania? The African Review (accepted paper) en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0856-0056
dc.identifier.uri http://www.suaire.sua.ac.tz/handle/123456789/3755
dc.description Journal Article en_US
dc.description.abstract Although Tanzania has ratified several international laws on corruption, the domestic enforcement of such laws remains problematic. Some social structures that sustain corruption in the country continue to exist. The article is informed by the theory of constructivism of international law. Some insights from cultural relativity theory, clashing moral values theory of corruption, Critical Theorist paradigm, and anti-colonial discursive framework have also been useful in informing the article. Using ethnographic longitudinal case study methodology, this article explores local subjectivities that interfere with the domestic enforcement of International laws on corruption in selected regions of Tanzania. The study has also attempted to answer the following question: can international law on corruption influence the local context and actors in an attempt to eliminate corruption in Tanzania? They key finding is that the presence of systemic corruption and local subjectivity hinders the fight against corruption. In turn, the situation hinders the domestic enforcement of international law. The study also highlights that the fifth phase government adopted an anti-corrupt cultural approach to address corruption in Tanzania. The cultural approach enabled Tanzania to attain significant achievements in the fight against corruption. In this regard, the study recommends a cultural approach to the elimination of corruption. The focus should be on creating an anti-corruption culture through good governance and democratization. The paper adds to the scholarship on cultural studies, development studies, human rights, African studies, governance, international law, and international relations. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher BRILL (see https://brill.com/view/journals/tare/tare-overview.xml?contents=About) en_US
dc.subject International law en_US
dc.subject Corruption en_US
dc.subject Domestic enforcement en_US
dc.subject Local subjectivity en_US
dc.subject Tanzania en_US
dc.title How do local subjectivities interfere with the domestic enforcement of International laws on corruption in selected regions of Tanzania? en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.url https://brill.com/view/journals/tare/tare-overview.xml?contents=About en_US


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