Sokoine University of Agriculture

Knowledge, attitude and socio-economic factors affecting receptivity of malaria control strategies in Lindi and Mtwara regions, Tanzania

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dc.contributor.author Nkulikwa, Z.A
dc.date.accessioned 2021-03-15T11:31:29Z
dc.date.available 2021-03-15T11:31:29Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.uri http://www.suaire.sua.ac.tz/handle/123456789/3405
dc.description.abstract Despite efforts to control malaria with its morbidity and mortality rates in Tanzania, it still persists. The main objective of the study on which this thesis is based was to investigate people’s knowledge, attitudes and socio-economic factors associated with receptivity of malaria control strategies. The specific objectives of the study were to assess knowledge about malaria control strategies and its association with demographic and socio-economic variables, examine attitude towards malaria control strategies and its association with demographic and socio-economic variables, and determine relationships between receptivity of malaria control strategies and knowledge, attitude and socio-economic factors. The study was conducted in Lindi and Mtwara Regions in 2017 and used a cross- sectional research design. Random sampling was used to select 306 heads of households. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected. Quantitative data were collected using a structured questionnaire, but qualitative data were collected through focus group discussions and key informant interviews. Qualitative data were analysed by being summarized by their themes, and comparing and contrasting arguments given by different interviewees based on content analysis. Quantitative data were analysed using IBM SPSS Statistics Version 26 Software whereby both descriptive statistics and inferential statistics were employed in analysis. Knowledge about malaria was moderate; the overall score on the scale that was used to measure it was 53%. The knowledge was significantly associated (p < 0.05) with sex of respondent, education level of respondent, main occupation of respondent, and income of household. The overall attitude towards malaria control strategies was positive (54.5 points above 48.0 points that indicated undecided attitude). There were significant associations (p < 0.05) between attitude towards malaria control strategies and sex of respondent, marital status, education level, main occupation, and household income. The minimum, median and maximum scores on a five-point scale which was used to measure receptivity of malaria control strategies were 126.72 and 198.00 respectively, and 20% and 80% of the respondents, respectively, had lower and higher receptivity. Receptivity of malaria control strategies was significantly different (p < 0.05) among respondents with different levels of knowledge, among respondents with different attitudes towards malaria control strategies, among respondents with different marital statuses, among households of various sizes, among households whose heads had various levels of education, among households with different amounts of income, and among respondents who had different occupations. On the basis of the findings, it is concluded that community members in the research area have information on malaria preventive strategies, but that they hardly have knowledge about malaria causes, how to utilize preventive measures, and the importance of using bed nets for malaria prevention. It is also concluded that sex of respondent, education level of respondent, main occupation of respondent and household income are main factors which explain knowledge about malaria in the research area. Another conclusion is that community members in the research have positive towards malaria control strategies, but that they have negative attitude towards distribution and use of mosquito nets. Moreover, sex of respondent, marital status, education level, main occupation and household income are main factors which explain the attitude. Besides, it is concluded that levels of knowledge levels, different attitudes towards malaria control strategies, different marital statuses, household sizes, levels of education, household income, and different occupations are main factors related to receptivity of malaria control strategies. On the basis of those conclusions, in order to increase receptivity of malaria control strategies and hence control malaria more effectively, the following recommendations are given. The government and relevant stakeholders should increase provision of knowledge about the nature of malaria, its prevention and cure. Communities should make effort to get the right knowledge about malaria and practise it. In provision of the knowledge about malaria, the main factors which are associated with it (sex of respondent, education level of respondent, main occupation of respondent, and income of household) should be given priority. Campaigns to control malaria should address attitude towards strategies to control it since attitude is inextricably connected with receptivity of malaria control strategies. In order to increase receptivity of malaria control strategies, knowledge about the strategies, attitude towards the strategies, marital statuses, household size, levels of education, household income, and different occupations should be given high priority as they are main factors related to the receptivity. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Sokoine University of Agriculture en_US
dc.subject Malaria control en_US
dc.subject Knowledge en_US
dc.subject Attitude en_US
dc.subject Lindi en_US
dc.subject Tanzania en_US
dc.subject Mtwara en_US
dc.title Knowledge, attitude and socio-economic factors affecting receptivity of malaria control strategies in Lindi and Mtwara regions, Tanzania en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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