Sokoine University of Agriculture

Prevalence of gastro-intestinal helminths in slaughtered cattle in Walungu Territory, South Kivu Province, Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo

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dc.contributor.author Bisimwa, N. P.
dc.contributor.author Lugano, R. M.
dc.contributor.author Bwihangane, B. A.
dc.contributor.author Wasso, S. D.
dc.contributor.author Kinimi, E.
dc.contributor.author Banswe, G.
dc.contributor.author Bajope, B.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-16T05:09:37Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-16T05:09:37Z
dc.date.issued 2018-04-13
dc.identifier.issn 2472-3371
dc.identifier.uri https://www.suaire.sua.ac.tz/handle/123456789/2866
dc.description Austin Journal of Veterinary Science & Animal Husbandry, 2018; 5 (1): 1039 en_US
dc.description.abstract An abattoir cross sectional survey was carried out to determine the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasitic helminths in slaughtered cattle at Kankinda and Mugogo Municipal abattoirs located in Walungu territory, South Kivu province, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Using qualitative and quantitative coprological examination, 200 fecal samples were tested. Gastrointestinal helminths’ eggs were detected in only 148 samples tested giving an overall prevalence of 74%. The most diversity class was nematodes with four species, followed by trematode and cestode with two species in each, both representing species abundances of 44.4%, 22.2% and 22.2% respectively and only one protozoan species was identified (11.1%). However, the prevalence of helminths in relation to sex and age group revealed no statistical difference at P value >0.05. The exotic breed presented the highest infection rate of 72.5% (OR=4.6, 95% CI: 1.9–11.1; p=0.0004) compared to the local breed. Similarly high prevalence of helminthes was found in slaughtered cattle from local farms 90.6% (OR=4.1; 95% CI: 1.9–9.5; p=0.0001) compared to cattle imported from Rwanda. The prevalent helminthes species identified were Eimeria bovis (74%), followed by Schistosoma bovis (41%); Hymenolepis diminuta (39%); Toxocara vitulorum (32.5%) and the least species observed were Fasciola gigantica (18%); Strongyloides papillosus (11.5%); Trichonstrongylus sp (7%); Haemonchus spp (6.5%); and Moniezia spp (6%). These findings reflect a growing burden of gastrointestinal parasite infections at abattoir level. Therefore, a proper management, improved hygiene and regular deworming practices should be institutionalized for prevention and control of parasitic infections in livestock. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Austin Publishing Group en_US
dc.subject Parasitic infection en_US
dc.subject Public health en_US
dc.subject Bovine en_US
dc.subject Prevalence en_US
dc.subject South Kivu en_US
dc.title Prevalence of gastro-intestinal helminths in slaughtered cattle in Walungu Territory, South Kivu Province, Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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