Sokoine University of Agriculture

Social influence on continuation of adopted agricultural technologies: a case of HIMA project Kilolo district

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dc.contributor.author Kilave, Edwin Ngapola
dc.date.accessioned 2014-12-01T06:56:12Z
dc.date.available 2014-12-01T06:56:12Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.uri https://www.suaire.sua.ac.tz/handle/123456789/271
dc.description.abstract This study was set to investigate social influence on continuation of adopted agricultural technologies in Ukwega and Mtitu wards of Kilolo District, Iringa Region. Specifically the study aimed at identifying innovations currently used after HIMA project, determining whether social influence was responsible for continued use of agricultural technologies and assessing socio-economic characteristics of household influencing adoption and continued use of adopted agricultural technologies. A total of 120 respondents (84 males and 36 females) who were involved in HIMA project interventions were interviewed. Quantitative data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) whereby content and structural functional analysis was used for qualitative data. The study revealed that HIMA project interventions that were extended to farmers included terraces, agroforestry; contour ploughing, crop rotation, use of improved seeds, multiple cropping system, mulching and tree planting on woodlots and boundaries. The average number of trees owned by households before HIMA has tremendously increased from 377 to 4155 after HIMA which was more than ten times. The finding from binary logistic regression revealed that of all the seven factors loaded into the model only three factors (farm size, farming experience and number of farms owned by the household) were statistically significant (p<0.05) in influencing continued use of adopted agricultural technologies. Farm size had highest Wald statistics of 6.286 implying that had big impact on influencing continuation of adopted technologies. This was followed by number of farms owned (p=0.015) with Wald statistics of 5.912 and farming experience (p=0.021) with Wald statistics of 5.337. Social influence had no effects towards influencing continuation of adopted agricultural technologies (p<0.05) and had very small Wald statistics of 0.150. The study thus concluded that the continuation of adopted agricultural technologies was not because of social influence but was because of other factors as pointed out above. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Sokoine University of Agriculture en_US
dc.subject Agricultural technologies en_US
dc.subject Kilolo district en_US
dc.subject HIMA project en_US
dc.subject Social influency en_US
dc.title Social influence on continuation of adopted agricultural technologies: a case of HIMA project Kilolo district en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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