Sokoine University of Agriculture

Linking the twin pandemics: Gender based violence and hiv in Serengeti District, Mara, Tanzania

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dc.contributor.author Sikira, A.
dc.contributor.author Urassa, J. K.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-18T08:58:45Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-18T08:58:45Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.uri http://www.suaire.sua.ac.tz/handle/123456789/2382
dc.description International Journal of Asian Social Science 2015,Vol. 5(6): pp324-334 en_US
dc.description.abstract Gender Based Violence (GBV) and HIV/AIDS are major health and social problems affecting women and men in African countries Tanzania included. While both men and women are victims of GBV and HIV/AIDS, women are more vulnerable than men. Socio-economic, biological and cultural factors are believed to exacerbate the problem. The current study explores the link between gender based violence and the spread of HIV/AIDS. Using Serengeti District as a study area, a cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted using a mixed method/approach, whereby administering a questionnaire, focus group discussion (FGDs) and in-depth interviews were employed. Twenty nine key informants and 64 participants were selected for FGDs, while 16 women (victims of GBV and HIV/AIDS) were purposively selected for in- depth interview. Qualitative information was analyzed using content analysis. GBV practices such as women to women marriages emerged to be a predictor of HIV because young women married to old women might have multiple relationships apart from the selected husband. Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and male circumcision are practiced using non sterilized knives which are culturally believed to be sacred which also fuels the spread of HIV/AIDS. Other GBV practices include the cleansing of the widow/widower; this is done through sexual contact between the widow and close relative of the deceased husband or using a village cleanser. Wife battery was found to be caused by husband or wife being suspected of involvement in extramarital relationship. Unfaithfulness of spouses increases risks of acquiring HIV to couples. The study recommends involvement of traditional leaders in the process of reducing GBV and HIV/AIDS spread. Awareness creation towards the use of both female and male condoms is of utmost importance. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher AESS en_US
dc.subject Gender Based Violence en_US
dc.subject HIV/AIDS en_US
dc.subject Men and women en_US
dc.subject Serengeti en_US
dc.subject Tanzania en_US
dc.title Linking the twin pandemics: Gender based violence and hiv in Serengeti District, Mara, Tanzania en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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