Sokoine University of Agriculture

Occurrence and characterization of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli o157:h7 and other non-sorbitol–fermenting e. coli in cattle and humans in urban areas of Morogoro, Tanzania

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Lupindu, A. M.
dc.contributor.author Olsen, J. E.
dc.contributor.author Ngowi, H. A.
dc.contributor.author Msoffe, P. L. M.
dc.contributor.author Mtambo, M. M.
dc.contributor.author Scheutz, F.
dc.contributor.author Dalsgaard, A.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-08T06:19:57Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-08T06:19:57Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.uri http://www.suaire.sua.ac.tz/handle/123456789/2044
dc.description Vector-borne and zoonotic diseases, 2014; 14 (7) en_US
dc.description.abstract Escherichia coli strains such as Shiga toxin–producing E. coli (STEC), enteropathogenic E. coli, enterotoxigenic, attaching, and effacing E. coli, and enteroinvasive E. coli cause diarrhea in humans. Although other serotypes exist, the most commonly reported STEC in outbreaks is O157:H7. A cross-sectional study was conducted to isolate and characterize non-sorbitol–fermenting (NSF) E. coli O157:H7 from urban and periurban livestock settings of Morogoro, Tanzania. Human stool, cattle feces, and soil and water samples were collected. Observations and questionnaire interview studies were used to gather information about cattle and manure management practices in the study area. E. coli were isolated on sorbitol MacConkey agar and characterized by conventional biochemical tests. Out of 1049 samples, 143 (13.7%) yielded NSF E. coli. Serological and antimicrobial tests and molecular typing were performed to NSF E. coli isolates. These procedures detected 10 (7%) pathogenic E. coli including STEC (n=7), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) (n=2), and attaching and effacing E. coli (A/EEC) (n=1) strains. The STEC strains had the ability to produce VT1 and different VT2 toxin subtypes that caused cytopathic effects on Vero cells. The prevalence of STEC in cattle was 1.6%, out of which 0.9% was serotype O157:H7 and the overall prevalence of diarrheagenic E. coli in cattle was 2.2%. The serotypes O157:H7, O142:H34, O113:H21, O+:H-,O +:H16, and O25:H4 were identified. One ESBLproducing isolate showed the MLST type ST131. To our knowledge, this is the first finding in Tanzania of this recently emerged worldwide pandemic clonal group, causing widespread antimicrobial-resistant infections, and adds knowledge of the geographical distribution of ST131. Cattle manure was indiscriminately deposited within residential areas, and there was direct contact between humans and cattle feces during manure handling. Cattle and manure management practices expose humans, animals, and the environment to pathogenic E. coli and other manure-borne pathogens. Therefore, there is a need to improve manure management practices in urban and periurban areas to prevent pathogen spread and associated human health risks. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. en_US
dc.subject Manure en_US
dc.subject Periurban en_US
dc.subject Public health en_US
dc.subject Sorbitol en_US
dc.subject MacConkey agar. en_US
dc.title Occurrence and characterization of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli o157:h7 and other non-sorbitol–fermenting e. coli in cattle and humans in urban areas of Morogoro, Tanzania en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.url https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24901881 en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search SUA IR


Browse

My Account