Sokoine University of Agriculture

Evaluation of seaweeds as mineral source in broiler diets

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dc.contributor.author Kessi, Faki Ame
dc.date.accessioned 2017-05-12T07:10:45Z
dc.date.available 2017-05-12T07:10:45Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri https://www.suaire.sua.ac.tz/handle/123456789/1506
dc.description A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE IN TROPICAL ANIMAL PRODUCTION OF SOKOINE UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURE. MOROGORO, TANZANIA. en_US
dc.description.abstract An experiment was conducted at the Poultry unit of Kizimbani Agriculture Training Institute in Zanzibar to evaluate the effect of seaweed as mineral source in the growth performance of broiler chickens and carcass characteristics. Two hundred and forty (240) broiler chickens were fed four dietary treatments (T1, T2, T3 and T4), containing 0, 1, 1.5 and 2% seaweeds, from 8 - 49 days of age. Feed intake was measured daily while live weight was measured on a weekly basis. After seven weeks 2 chickens from each replicate were slaughtered to determine carcass yield and carcass characteristics. Proximate and mineral analysis of seaweed, individual feed ingredients and experimental diets were determined. The results showed that CP was highest (21.84%) in T4 and lowest (17.66%) in T2. Highest energy was observed in T3 (3019.55 kcal/kg DM) and lowest (3007.35 kcal/kg DM) in T1. TDMI per bird was lowest (4.0kg) in T1 and highest (4.6kg) in T3. Proximate analysis of seaweed showed high ash content (47.65%) low levels of CP (5.42%) and CF (3.29%). Mineral analysis in seeweed showed that it is rich in both macro and micro elements and low in amino acids. Differences for FCR between treatments were insignificant (P > 0.05). Body weight was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in T3 (2549.0g) and lower for T4 (2275.3g). Significant differences in carcass and non-carcass components were observed (P < 0.05). Final body weight was lower in T1 (2229.4g) and high in T3 (2481.9g). Carcass weight was highest in T3 (1961.3g) followed by T4 (1903.8g) and lowest in T1 (1673.8g) whereas dressing percentage was lowest in T1 (75%) and highest in T3 (79%). Dietary treatments had insignificant effect on overall lean, bone and fat weights. Dietary treatments had no effect on meat tenderness. Similarly, dietary treatment had no significant effect on tissue distribution apart from the bone in the drumstick. It is concluded from the current study that, seaweed inclusion at 1.5% had significant positive effects on growth rate and increased weight of broiler chickens. In view of this, poultry farmers should be educated on the importance of using seaweed as feed ingredient or feed additive in their feed formulation. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Sokoine University of Agriculture en_US
dc.subject Seaweeds Evaluation en_US
dc.subject Mineral source en_US
dc.subject Broiler diets en_US
dc.subject Poultry unit en_US
dc.subject Kizimbani Agriculture Training Institute en_US
dc.subject Zanzibar en_US
dc.title Evaluation of seaweeds as mineral source in broiler diets en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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