Sokoine University of Agriculture

Non-timber forest products for climate change adaptation around Iyondo forest reserve in Kilombero district, Tanzania

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dc.contributor.author Balama, Chelestino Peter
dc.date.accessioned 2017-04-29T13:52:10Z
dc.date.available 2017-04-29T13:52:10Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri http://www.suaire.sua.ac.tz/handle/123456789/1474
dc.description A THESIS SUBMITTED IN FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY OF THE SOKOINE UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURE. MOROGORO, TANZANIA en_US
dc.description.abstract The aim of this thesis was to enhance the understanding of the role of Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFPs) in climate change adaptation through studying households adjacent and distant to Iyondo Forest Reserve (IFR) in Kilombero District, Tanzania. Apparently, Kilombero District is prone to diverse climatic stresses; and the role of NTFPs in the way that households adapt and achieve livelihood security in the face of climate stressors is neither well known nor documented. The study aimed at addressing this need through use of sustainable livelihood framework. Data were collected using socio-economic appraisal, forest inventory and review of secondary information. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses were undertaken. The multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the socio-economic factors influencing adoption of developed adaptation strategies. Findings showed that both households adjacent and distant perceived prevalence of changing climate in terms of dry spells, floods, heavy rains and extreme heat. Three NTFPs namely: firewood, medicinal plants and thatch grasses were identified to be of priority. The number of stems and seedlings per hectare of firewood and medicinal trees species in IFR was relatively high implying availability and active natural recruitment. The economic value of the priority NTFPs, at a discounting rate of 10% was TZS 31 971 508 412.24. The households had developed local adaptation strategies that include: use of NTFPs, as well as farm and non-farm strategies, such as crop diversification, changing cropping calendar, adopting modern farming techniques, livestock rearing and fishing. Inferential statistics showed that household size, residential period, land ownership and household income were the socio-economic variables that influenced adoption of existing local adaptation strategies positively and significantly at 5% probability level. The study concluded that NTFPs were not only used for subsistence but also for different types of livelihood capitals. They are closely linked to people’s portfolio of wider strategies that were often used for trade and gaining financial capital. Findings suggested that policies aimed at supporting rural adaptive capacity need to address the rules and social factors that impede access and support the way NTFPs contribute to various types of livelihood capitals en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Sokoine University of Agriculture en_US
dc.subject Non-timber en_US
dc.subject Forest products en_US
dc.subject Climate change en_US
dc.subject Iyondo forest reserve en_US
dc.subject Kilombero District en_US
dc.subject Tanzania en_US
dc.title Non-timber forest products for climate change adaptation around Iyondo forest reserve in Kilombero district, Tanzania en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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